CDC Says Fatal Teen Car Crashes in Decline

CDC Says Fatal Teen Car Crashes in Decline

A new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Report suggests that state law limits on teen driving may explain the drop in fatal teen car crashes over the last half decade. The role of parent instruction and guidance has also been identified as a strong factor in the reduced amount of fatal car accidents.

According to a recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report, the number of fatal workers compensation car accidents has decreased by 33 percent over the last five years. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report shows the amount of teenage car accident deaths dropped by almost 1,000 between 2004 and 2008. In 2004 the number of teenage deaths from car accidents was 2,200, and the number dropped to 1,400 in 2008. The report reviewed car accident information involving 16-year-old and 17-year-old drivers from 2004 to 2008.

Among the factors in improved driver safety including road improvements and airbags, new state laws on teenage driving was cited as the major reason for improved road safety for teens. Since 1996, 49 states have enacted restricted driving rules for teenage driving that limits the ability of teenagers to drive in the most dangerous road conditions. Graduated driver’s licensing programs regulate the time of day when a teenage driver can drive and when other teenagers can be passengers of a teen behind the wheel.

The states with the toughest graduated driver’s licensing programs, New York and New Jersey, saw the greatest amount of reduced deaths. The state with the most lenient teenage driving rules saw less of a reduction. Parents were also cited as a major factor in the regulation of teenage driving. Parents help re-enforce state law requirements by restricting the amount of teenage passengers and driving at night.